Weekly Writing Exercise: World Building

It’s that time of the week again folks! The time where I tell you what to write and you go ahead and do it! As always, I am always open to reading anyone’s prompt, so feel free to share it on one of my many pages. I’ll do my best to respond and give feedback to your work.

Anyway, onwards to this week’s prompt!

If you read yesterday’s writing corner at all, you’ll know that this week is going to focus heavily on world building. Why world building you may ask. Well for one, it’s important to really know the setting that you are going to be working in. As I stated yesterday, the more you know of your world and the mechanics that exist in it, the better the odds are of writing a greater story.

The other reason is simple. I’m struggling with my own setting so having a writing prompt that helps you, also helps me! It’s a win-win.

So this week we really want to focus on building your setting up. So go ahead, tell me a bit about your world! Does it take place here on Earth or does it take place on another planet? Maybe it is on Earth but in a different time period. Maybe it doesn’t even exist in our universe. Get creative and funky with it, tell me where your setting takes place.

While we’re at it, once you know the planet your on, tell me about the continent. Or maybe it’s one giant country. Tell me how the mechanics of your world come together. Then tell me the region your story takes place in. Bring that microscope in closer and show me a city. Or a town. Or hell, maybe it’s even just a home in the country.

Paint me a picture. Let me see the world that your characters in habit.

Don’t forget to tell me about the weather and environment as well. Is it always hot or always cold? Maybe it’s neither. Does it rain a lot or is it always sunny, like in Philadelphia. (See what I did there? It’s a really bad joke.) Is there wind and if so how much, if any? Is the world exotic and would be exotic by our standards or book standards.

When it comes to writing setting, there is so much that you can show a reader. So show me a bit of your world. Write a couple paragraphs that make me feel like I’ve just sat down and have been transported to your world. Make it fun and make it unique!

As always, check back in tomorrow where I’ll throw together my own exotic world for everyone to fall into.

The Writer’s Corner

Hello all!

Seems like I’ve had a bit of success as of late covering writing on my blog. In honor of that, I decided besides doing a writing prompt every Tuesday and Wednesday, I would also give some tips for writing. Some of these may be about writing fiction, while others may cover other topics in writing as well.

However, today’s is going to focus a bit on world building. As of right now, I write for my own group called Pantheon Productions while also striving to become a best selling author. Both of these things are new challenges for me and so it has led to my life being engulfed in the world of writing. With both Pantheon Productions and my novel still in the beginning stages, I find myself really in the midst of world building and I decided I would share some things that I’ve personally learned while doing it.

The first is to think as broad as possible. There is a reason that world building is called “world building.” When I went into my first book, A Monstrous Tomorrow, I spent more time figuring the state of the planet I was creating over the finer details. Much like character development, the more you know about your world, the easier it is to write things.

This has lead to me asking some of the more bizarre questions in my writing career. Questions along the lines of “if it’s hot on the northern side of the planet, is it naturally cold on the southern?” “How long are days versus nights?” “What kind of plants and animals exist here?” All of this has been fun to do so far.

With that world building though, there is also the decisions to make in how characters will react and how believable to make it. I love writing in science fiction and horror and one of my favorite things to do in both of those is to make it feel as real as possible. That’s why as my projects come out for Pantheon Productions, or exerts come out of my manuscript, you’ll find that a lot of it is written to have the reader as immersed as possible. I want the reader or viewer to feel like somewhere nearby, the events I write are happening.

That’s what I think makes good world building overall. This can be said to be the same for about every genre and that’s the main point. As a writer, if you go in and take the time to understand every detail of your world, to a point that it feels real even to you, then you’ve done a good job.

That’s all I have to say on the subject for now. Check back in tomorrow for an exercise to help begin creating your very own world.